• Chemical Brain Freeze

Announcing the launch of “The Adventures of Unstructured Time” radio program

It is with pleasure to announce the introduction of a new internet radio show that will start on Monday, September 10th airing from 11:00-12:00AM CST at 21.6 THE NET.  “The Adventures of Unstructured Time” will air every Monday during this time period.  Co-hosting the show will be author and speaker Chuck Inman along with author and radio host “Rancher Ron” Hoesterery.  We will be discussing the non-financial issues baby boomers deal with in retirement or as they get ready to retire.

A key component of the program will be discussing elements such as the impact retirement has on relationships, priorities, planning, default behaviors, decision making and much more.  You know all those things we wrestle with trying to figure out our best journey in retirement. There will be a key component concerning the effect of Chemical Brain Freezes and how to stay in the game during difficulty and stress.

Some of the most stressful situations we find ourselves entangled with in regards to retirement are dealing with facing the unknown of the future.  Retired or getting close to retirement there are plenty of unknowns which we encounter. Understanding how the brain works during stressful situations is key to positive self-leadership and providing a path through the unknown.

So be sure to tune into this new program “The Adventures of Unstructured Time” with your hosts Chuck Inman and Ron Hoesterey. The program will be aired on 21.6 THE NET 11:00-12:00AM CST on Monday mornings and a repeat of the recorded program on Wednesdays 3:00-4:00PM, Thursdays 6:00-7:00PM and Fridays 11:00-12:00AM, again at 21.6 THE NET.

 

Being Your Best on Your Next Adventure

No coastingHave you ever asked yourself the question “What would it look like if I became my personal best on my next adventure? Most people just rise to a level of acceptability and not excellence. A great question Mike Rayburn (www.MikeRayburn.com) raised during a recent presentation. “Have you resolved to be your best?” What do you think that would look like?
In today’s world most people coast through life and that’s fine. The one thing you need to recognize and understand is that the problem with coasting is that it’s all downhill. If comfort is your goal, success is not in your future.
So what does it take for you to become the best at what you do? Interesting question because most of us know what we need to do but we just don’t do it. This why a sense of purpose is so important to us. What are those goals and adventures that are so important we don’t want to approach them half-hearted or in a coasting mode? Do you really want to be a half-hearted spouse, parent, friend or co-worker? Every adventure we embark on has an impact on others and do we provide a positive impact? Anything worth doing is worth doing well. But sometimes we need help and this can be our biggest stumbling block.
You’ve heard people talk about being self-taught and we all teach ourselves quite a bit and the Internet makes it easier everyday. However sometimes when we are self-taught we fail to notice that our teachers aren’t great in every area. Take the time and effort to find good coaches to help you with you adventures. It can have a big impact.
Sometimes when we set out on a new adventure we start by compromising when setting our goals. We aim too low and wind up settling for mediocrity and second best. Instead, continue to work on asking the question “What if? What would this adventure look like? How could I make this happen and what would be the positive impact on those around me?”
Tough questions to ask, even tougher questions to answer when you are true to yourself. But by asking these questions and answering them truthfully, you define who you are as you embark on your next adventure.
Thanks for coming along!

What if, When Making Plans for the Next Adventure

Mike RayburnThere I was, working and planning away on my new adventure and feeling good about it. Then I had an opportunity to go see Mike Rayburn(www.MikeRayburn.com) live at a recent program. He was absolutely phenomenal. Not only a gifted musician and storyteller but he really got you thinking. He has a book titled “What If?” and I would suggest purchasing it on his website. I wanted to point out just a few key things Mike got me thinking about as I plan my new adventure.

He asks the question, “What if?” Not meaning that you are going to do it but rather just asking what is possible. What if I could? How would that work if I could?
He points out that our default behavior in life is that we look at or for reasons not to do things. Instead we should change our default behavior to where we look for reasons we can do things! A very simplistic but astute rationale on how we can get things done. He also points out the only way to manage change is to create change. Again our default behavior is to fight change. What if we shifted that to creating change and embracing change? It creates a completely different picture doesn’t it? The one thing we know to be true about our plans is that nothing ever goes according to plan! So embrace change.
Here is the reason for these default behaviors: We take problems and put them on a pedestal and worship them. Mike’s perspective is, quit driving through life with the brakes on and get creative. The world need’s our creativity. He lined out three steps to get started:
1. Outside Observation – get that 30,000-foot view of what you are dealing with and get a handle of the size and scope.
2. Take a problem or situation and say, “What is the Opportunity?” Then ask, “What if?”
3. Open up creativity and take physical action on it.
Here are a couple of his other thoughts, which will get your thinking moving in the right direction:
A. Set goals you can’t achieve, not 5-10% increases. What does it take to double what you want to do?
B. Don’t start with what’s possible?, start with what’s cool?. The type of goal it takes courage to think about.
A sense of purpose is the most motivating factor. What is your sense of purpose? Some good food for thought until next time.
Thanks for coming along.

What’s your next Adventure?

Backpacking crossingThe great Helen Keller provided this prolific statement, “Life is either a daring adventure or nothing at all!” What a great way to look at our lives. Helen Keller overcame so much adversity and became an inspiration encouraging boldness and audacity. We may not have the adversity Helen Keller did, but we do have our ups and downs, our successes and failures and our starts and stops. Sometimes life doesn’t turn out exactly as we plan but the key question is, ”What do we do about it?”
I have watched people who have stumbled and they just struggle trying to get back up and moving forward. Sometimes they get moving again but its like they are in a fog and not really living life but rather just going through the motions.
What is it that we have to do to begin living the life we want to have and move in the direction of our dreams? In my book Chemical Brain Freeze, I talk about overcoming default behaviors and moving forward. These are some key thoughts to making a positive move in order to get you moving in the direction you want to go.
Sometimes it just makes sense to break things down into smaller steps.
Summer has just about come to an end and it was a great summer. We usually think of all kinds of adventures to be had during the summer months.
Now ask yourself the simple question; “What’s my next adventure?” What’s my next adventure for today? This week? Next month? Next year? Come up with an adventure and go make it happen. It can be such a positive experience. Don’t wait for something to come to you. Go make something happen and have fun with! You’ll be glad you did! In the weeks ahead I’ll fill you in on what I have been working on the last half of this summer and what an adventure I’ll be starting. Over 25 years ago I was told I couldn’t do something and I decided now was the time to go it.
Thanks for coming along!

Teaching and Learning Need to be in Sync

Michael J FoxTeaching and learning need to be in sync to be successful. Whether it is in school or the business world. To be able to learn and then apply your learning is even better. Sometimes we have material put before us and there is just not a connection nor an application. Simon Sinek has a very good TED Talk on How Great Leaders Inspire Action. It’s a few years old but if you haven’t seen it, it’s definitely worth watching.
Start with why — how great leaders inspire action | Simon Sinek | TEDxPugetSound
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4ZoJKF_VuA

What stops us from reaching our goals?

boy fishingWhen I was a small child, my family went fishing with my aunt and uncle at their favorite lake. To get to their boat you had to go down stairs to a raft and then paddle out in a small skiff to retrieve the boat. I am one of the first on the raft along with my aunt and uncle. Before I put on my life jacket, I walk over to the edge of the raft and fall into the lake.

Aunt Pauline is in shock when she hears the splash and then can’t find me on the raft. She freezes in place. Uncle Bill moves quickly to the edge, grabs my arm and pulls me back up on the raft. I’m wet but no worse for wear.

Later Aunt Pauline confesses, “I was so shocked I couldn’t do anything. I couldn’t scream, move or think. I just stood there.”

Sometimes events in our lives, like watching someone fall off a raft, cause us to have a Chemical Brain Freeze®where we freeze and can’t move. But have you noticed there are times in our everyday lives where we feel stuck in a rut and we can’t move just like aunt Pauline? When we question why we aren’t moving forward and reaching our goals, we realize there are default behaviors holding us back.

In my new book coming out in a couple of weeks, Chemical Brain Freeze®– How to Stay in the Game during Difficulty and Stress, we look at default behaviors and reasons behind the behaviors that hold us back.

It is fascinating to understand what keeps us from becoming all that we can be and reaching the goals that are most important to us.

We’ll continue to explore this concept in the next couple of blogs.

Thanks for coming along.boy fishing

Playing Small during difficulty and stress

cropstopplaying smallLinda sat down in her boss’s office to update her on the progress of the project.

“How is everything with the project?”  her boss, Karen asks.

“We are going to miss one of our major milestones,” Linda comments. “We have a personnel issue that I need some help with.”

“What’s going on?” Karen asks.

“Mark isn’t meeting his commitments to the project. He has been behind on every one of his deadlines and it’s causing the entire project to get behind. When I try and talk to him about his performance he gets very upset and claims he is doing all he can do. I think it would help if you talked with his boss to help get him back on track.” Linda says.

“I don’t really feel comfortable talking to his boss right now,” Karen answers. “Don’t talk to Mark directly anymore this week and we’ll see if we can figure something out.”

Linda’s e-mails and phone messages to Karen during the week go unanswered and the project gets farther behind.

Exceptional leaders play big and do the proper things with the big picture in mind. When our primitive portion of the brain, the amygdala, kicks in during difficult times, we resort to default behaviors and we wind up playing small. Karen remembered an argument she had with Mark’s boss six months ago. Her primitive brain was cautioning her not to go there again. Her playing small best leadership move at the moment was to tell Linda not to talk to Mark.

How often do you see people playing small on a daily basis in business and your personal life?  We are going to be focusing on the ability to play big during times of difficulty and stress during the next few blogs and understand what our default behaviors due to us.

Thanks for coming along.

The Difficulty of Being a Transparent Leader

Genuine, authentic and transparent are the traits consistently used to describe exceptional leaders.  Yet making these traitTransparencys a part of your daily life is not so easy to make happen.  Let’s take a look at transparency.  Why is it so difficult to be transparent?  The main reason is that you have to hold yourself accountable for your actions.  We judge ourselves based on our intent.  Most of us have really good intentions.  I personally don’t know of anyone who gets up in the morning and tells himself or herself they are going to go out and just stink it up for the day.  Sometimes they get to work and step in it big time and create quite the stink, but not intentionally.
So we all have good intentions but that isn’t enough, because others judge us based on our actions.  It is our actions, which determine the impact we have on others.  To be transparent we have to ensure our actions line up with our intent so we have the impact we want on our customers, employees, vendors, family and friends.  If our actions routinely don’t line up with our intent we can be seen as hypocritical.  Not a good word to be used to describe you if you are working on becoming an exceptional leader.          Thanks for coming along.

 

Getting a Clear View of What We Want to Accomplish in 2014.

Vista ViewAs we close out the year 2013 and prepare for 2014, it is a good time to reflect on our accomplishments this year and then look at some of the missed goals we didn’t achieve. It’s easy to pat ourselves on the back and glow in our accomplishments but what about those goals we consider important enough to make our list but we didn’t get around to completing. Do we take them off of our list for 2014 or add them back on, hoping we will accomplish them in the new year?

One of the key questions to ask ourselves as we plan for 2014 is: What are we trying to create? What is the reason behind making a change? Do you have a picture of what the end result looks like? Are there examples or models of what you are trying to accomplish? Charles Garfield in his book Peak Performance showed with his research that peak athletes and peak performers were visualizers. They see their goal, they feel it and experience it before they actually go out and try to accomplish it.

I like to think about it as getting above the fray, gaining that vista view and seeing your objective clearly. When you can see clearly where you’re going, you create a picture that can be repeated in your mind over and over. This picture then let’s you know how accomplishing your goals will have an impact on your life both professionally and personally.

When difficult situations arise you can stay calm because you know where you are going and can make the proper decisions to get to the end result that matters. If you don’t know where you are going then you have no clue if you are making a good or bad decision and fear begins to creep into your decision making process. Take the time to truly understand where you are headed and why it’s important to you.
You will get comfortable with the decisions you have to make, and the fear will not be a deciding factor in how you make decisions.
Take some time to create a clear picture of where you want to go in 2014. It will be worth the effort.
Thanks for coming along.

Default Behaviors Keeping Us From Reaching Our Goals

elder workoutWalking into the fitness center, I was ready to get through my workout with a minimal amount of pain.  Sitting down on a weight machine I go through my first set.  As I turn to adjust the weight for my second set, I hear a voice.
“Would mind doing the last two reps for me?”  the elderly gentleman says with a grin.
“It doesn’t get any easier the more you do it does it?” I ask him.
“No it doesn’t,” he says.
“Do you know what the secret to a good workout program is?” I ask him.
“I would love to know,” he says.
“What I have found out over the years is the key to consistent morning workouts is to get the feet over the side of the bed and onto the floor before the brain wakes up.” I respond.
He chuckles, “Isn’t that the truth.  If you just get moving and don’t think about it too much, it’s not as bad of an event as your brain can make it out to be if you let it think about it too much.  I’m 79 years old and have been working out three times per week for the last 10 years.”
“Did you work out before 10 years ago?” I ask.
“Oh no,” he replies. “I thought I was too old to work out in my 50’s and 60’s.  I hit 69 and my doctor told me I would really enjoy the benefits of working out and here I am, feeling good and lots of energy.”
How ironic is it, that we allow ourselves to paint a mental picture of what we can and can’t do and then for 20 years believe it so strong we don’t do it?  In this case, the elderly gentleman convinced himself he was too old to work out in his 50”s and 60’s so he didn’t.
In my new book Nimble, I refer to default behaviors we resort to which can hold us back from achieving the goals that are the most important to us.  We can set up mental roadblocks so strong we can go decades believing we can’t accomplish objectives.  Yet when we recognize these default behaviors and move through them we are almost always amazed at what we can accomplish.
What are your default behaviors, which are holding you back from being your best?  Take some time to analyze some of your most common excuses for why things don’t get accomplished.  You may find out you can get around those default behaviors and accomplish the goals most important to you.
Thanks for coming along.