• Chemical Brain Freeze

Announcing the launch of “The Adventures of Unstructured Time” radio program

It is with pleasure to announce the introduction of a new internet radio show that will start on Monday, September 10th airing from 11:00-12:00AM CST at 21.6 THE NET.  “The Adventures of Unstructured Time” will air every Monday during this time period.  Co-hosting the show will be author and speaker Chuck Inman along with author and radio host “Rancher Ron” Hoesterery.  We will be discussing the non-financial issues baby boomers deal with in retirement or as they get ready to retire.

A key component of the program will be discussing elements such as the impact retirement has on relationships, priorities, planning, default behaviors, decision making and much more.  You know all those things we wrestle with trying to figure out our best journey in retirement. There will be a key component concerning the effect of Chemical Brain Freezes and how to stay in the game during difficulty and stress.

Some of the most stressful situations we find ourselves entangled with in regards to retirement are dealing with facing the unknown of the future.  Retired or getting close to retirement there are plenty of unknowns which we encounter. Understanding how the brain works during stressful situations is key to positive self-leadership and providing a path through the unknown.

So be sure to tune into this new program “The Adventures of Unstructured Time” with your hosts Chuck Inman and Ron Hoesterey. The program will be aired on 21.6 THE NET 11:00-12:00AM CST on Monday mornings and a repeat of the recorded program on Wednesdays 3:00-4:00PM, Thursdays 6:00-7:00PM and Fridays 11:00-12:00AM, again at 21.6 THE NET.

 

Emotional challenges for Baby Boomers

Baby boomers face many emotional challenges as they retire or get ready to retire. A simple but dynamic sentence isn’t it! When you examine the dynamics of the US population we see a shift in demographics that our country has never seen before.
Baby boomers, the generation of Americans born between 1946 and 1964 began reaching age 65 in 2011 and will continue until 2029. This generation makes up approximately 20% of the US population. The staggering fact is that there are 10,000 baby boomers reaching age 65 every single day. That is someone turning age 65 about every 7 seconds of every single day.

The focus of this particular sector of the population and its relationship to the subject of chemical brain freeze is very interesting. It deals with emotional challenges that baby boomer will have in retirement. Let’s reflect back on what a career provides for you besides just a paycheck. At work, you had an identity and were a contributor. You were respected for the work you did and people relied on you. You had a social network whether it was being a mentor or hanging with your favorite lunch cohorts. With the demands of your career, you also realized you provided value to your associates and customers. You exchanged feedback and advice, praise and criticism. You were part of something larger than just you.

Now with retirement just around the corner or already having taken place we have some new things to think about. For instance, what provides that feeling of purpose in your new phase of life being a baby boomer. The place to look for that feeling of purpose is within, whether it is adjusting your lifestyle or adjusting to a new career.

This is where the personal leadership and emotional intelligence comes into play in your changing world. A simple example, is a married couple who both retire within a few years of each other. For the first time in their marriage they are both home at the same time roughly 24/7. They seem to get in each other’s way trying to figure what to do with this next stage of life. One of the spouse’s may be operating a small business out of the home and can’t seem to get the privacy needed for conference calls and business calls. Default behaviors, those automatic responses you have to specific stimuli, come into play and tempers get short. It doesn’t take too much conversation to anger either spouse because they don’t feel like they are being heard or understood properly. Sharp words are exchanged in a heated argument and then silence because someone doesn’t feel valued.

This isn’t quite the ideal mood that was anticipated for this stage of life. Everything was supposed to be relaxing, calm and tranquil. These are the golden years but they don’t feel too golden in a lot of cases. This is where the emotional intelligence and personal leadership material can have an impact. You now have the time to work on those difficult conversations. So how do you make those conversations happen?

One of the key subject areas in the Chemical Brain Freeze- How to Stay in the Game During Difficulty and Stress book, is understanding how the body works when the brain responds to stimuli. You’ve heard of the fight or flight syndrome, right? Where our brain gets ready to fight or flee it sends some chemicals to different parts of the body so we respond appropriately when we feel threatened. There are times when even a question is asked in a certain way which can cause us to get defensive in a matter of seconds.

Have you noticed there are times in our everyday lives where we feel stuck in a rut and we can’t move in the direction we want to go? When we question why we aren’t moving forward and reaching our goals, we realize there are default behaviors holding us back. Look at some of the issues baby boomers will be experiencing in the next several years:

o Caring for their elderly parents
o Health Issues
o Being Able to Afford Retirement
o 2nd career
o What to do with time
o Finding a sense of purpose
o Boredom
o Depression
Default behaviors will definitely have an impact in dealing with these issues because there are numerous emotions centered around baby boomers in a changing world.
You can click on the Chemical Brain Freeze book and buy a copy at the on-line store. You will be transferred to the Adventure Jerky website where the on-line store is located. Adventure Jerky – Fuel for the Journey, provides fuel for the body and fuel for the mind. The book “Be Your Best on Your Next Journey” will help you find your sense of purpose and passion. You will then be able to pick your adventure and ignite your activity.
In going through the stages of finding your passion, picking your adventure and igniting your activity, a little bit of personal leadership and emotional intelligence goes a long way!
Thanks for coming along!
Chemical Brain Freeze

Aggrandize vs Minimize

AggrandizeSometimes the most difficult item in coaching people is getting them to move forward. People are afraid of making mistakes and they hold back and don’t grow. If you think about martial arts, you start as a beginner and learn the basics of movement from using your, hands, elbows, feet, shins and your head. Each new belt you add skills. You make mistakes but learn along the way. In fact if you make the same mistake over and over in martial arts, you will have the bruises to show for it. The secret is not to repeat the mistake but rather to learn and grow from the mistakes and missteps and aggrandize.
In business and life it’s not always about being right all of the time but rather learning, growing and contributing. Once one becomes a black belt it doesn’t mean the journey is over. Rather it means the journey has just begun because now you have the skills to take it up to the next level. Keep working on your management and leadership skills the rewards are big.

Teaching and Learning Need to be in Sync

Michael J FoxTeaching and learning need to be in sync to be successful. Whether it is in school or the business world. To be able to learn and then apply your learning is even better. Sometimes we have material put before us and there is just not a connection nor an application. Simon Sinek has a very good TED Talk on How Great Leaders Inspire Action. It’s a few years old but if you haven’t seen it, it’s definitely worth watching.
Start with why — how great leaders inspire action | Simon Sinek | TEDxPugetSound
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4ZoJKF_VuA

Default Behaviors and Resolutions

2015 resolutionsWe are midway through the month of January and I’m already noticing a decrease in people at the fitness center. Right after the first of the year, people flocked into the fitness centers vowing to uphold their New Year’s resolutions to get into shape and lose weight with their new memberships. How are you doing with your resolutions?
In my book “Chemical Brain Freeze – How to Stay in the Game During Difficulty and Stress”, I discuss default behaviors and how we get off track from our goals and resolutions. Sometimes it’s understanding the unmet emotional needs that drive our behaviors, which can cause these to become default behaviors. Everyone has sincere thoughts and ideas about making changes. Sometimes it is health related, other times it just to get the benefits from getting back into shape.
I hear people talk about feeling self conscious about going to the fitness center to work out. That portion of the brain called the amygdala is warning us we may not feel like we fit in properly. Our default behavior kicks in and we wind up talking ourselves out of going to the gym. Here is the interesting aspect of this type of self-talk. We get all worked up about what other people may be thinking about us. In reality nobody cares what you do, they all think everyone is looking at them. To overcome our default behaviors in this situation we need to understand why we want to get fit with our resolutions.
If you take just a little bit of time to work on what your fitness goals are, such as losing weight, muscle toning or increasing aerobic time and then figure out what the rewards will be from these workouts during the week. Write them down and keep track on a calendar. Give yourself benchmarks. Celebrate when hit your goals. Simple effective way to overcome default behaviors.
Guess what? If you can overcome default behaviors that keep you from exercising you can use the same strategy for any goal you have set for 2015. Don’t wait until October to start working on your goals. Start now and watch what happens.

“Chemical Brain Freeze® ” Book release

CBF Book photoF

New book just released – “Chemical Brain Freeze® -How to Stay in the Game During Difficulty and Stress”. This is Chuck’s new book that demonstrates how to reach higher performance levels.
Our behaviors are affected by the fast-paced world we live in and the stress and difficulties that come with this hectic pace. We need to be at our best during the most stressful situations but our brain isn’t on the same wavelength. Chuck teaches you how to stay engaged in those stressful situations and perform at your best.
Chemical Brain Freeze® explores what happens when we get stressed out and how we can handle situations more productively:
• How the brain works during difficulty and stress
• How we get derailed from reaching our goals

You will learn:
• What you can do to stay in the game during pressure situations
• How to overcome default behaviors
• How to increase performance both professionally and personally
Go to the Chuck Inman on-line store or Amazon.com and purchase your copy today!

Nimble Interview

Tom on LeadershipLast week Tom Cox, columnist for the Oregon Business News magazine, interviewed me about my book “Nimble-How to Lead Above the Turmoil of Change.“ Tom is a leadership expert and hosts a radio show “Tom on Leadership.”  It was a fun Nimble interview and we focused on leadership qualities and the role of emotional intelligence in leadership. To listen to the radio interview just copy the following into your browser.

www.blogtalkradio.com/tom-on-leadership/2014/09/11/nimble-managing-others-through-change-with-chuck-inman

Thanks for coming along

Exceptional leaders understand default behaviors

AphephobiaOver the last several weeks we have been discussing how exceptional leaders play big by staying in the game during difficult and stressful times. We’ve covered how default reactions by the amygdala can cause us to act out and we may not even realize we are doing it. Exceptional leaders have self-awareness and understand the impact they have on those they lead. Last week I ran across a great little story on a default behavior we can probably all relate to at some time.

There was an old song by Sting, lead singer of the British rock group “The Police”, which had the lyrics “Don’t stand so close to me.”

Well guess what? The amygdala really doesn’t like people getting too close to us. In different societies personal space is varied. In parts of Asia you never look someone in the eyes, because it is considered very offensive. In western society we have about a two-foot circumference of personal space. Someone encroaches on that space and our amygdala triage center starts shouting, “Warning, Warning, trespassers!”

In Australia they did a study on shoppers and the change in attitude of the shoppers when someone encroached their space. The study group hired “relatively attractive” phantom shoppers in their 30’s to ever so lightly brush up against shoppers or just stand near them. The results were those who were targeted, either lightly brushed by the phantom shoppers or had their space encroached, spent less time in the store and when surveyed they had a more negative brand evaluation of the store. The amygdala had gone on high alert due to encroachment of space or touching.

The results showed that people who didn’t get crowded were more likely to linger and buy something they liked. The amygdala was soothed and customers could focus on what they were shopping for at the moment.

Just an example to show how even exceptional leaders have to be on high alert for default behaviors. We are constantly being bombarded with stimuli and our brain will react to it or if we are aware we can respond to it.

Thanks for coming along.

Playing Small during difficulty and stress

cropstopplaying smallLinda sat down in her boss’s office to update her on the progress of the project.

“How is everything with the project?”  her boss, Karen asks.

“We are going to miss one of our major milestones,” Linda comments. “We have a personnel issue that I need some help with.”

“What’s going on?” Karen asks.

“Mark isn’t meeting his commitments to the project. He has been behind on every one of his deadlines and it’s causing the entire project to get behind. When I try and talk to him about his performance he gets very upset and claims he is doing all he can do. I think it would help if you talked with his boss to help get him back on track.” Linda says.

“I don’t really feel comfortable talking to his boss right now,” Karen answers. “Don’t talk to Mark directly anymore this week and we’ll see if we can figure something out.”

Linda’s e-mails and phone messages to Karen during the week go unanswered and the project gets farther behind.

Exceptional leaders play big and do the proper things with the big picture in mind. When our primitive portion of the brain, the amygdala, kicks in during difficult times, we resort to default behaviors and we wind up playing small. Karen remembered an argument she had with Mark’s boss six months ago. Her primitive brain was cautioning her not to go there again. Her playing small best leadership move at the moment was to tell Linda not to talk to Mark.

How often do you see people playing small on a daily basis in business and your personal life?  We are going to be focusing on the ability to play big during times of difficulty and stress during the next few blogs and understand what our default behaviors due to us.

Thanks for coming along.

Texas Association of Hostage Negotiators

TAHS3 linkedin 111213EI had the opportunity to speak to over 350 police negotiators yesterday at the Texas Association of Hostage Negotiators 20th anniversary conference. My topic was Control Chemical Brain Freeze, how to stay in the game during difficulty and stress. What a great group, which was very receptive to receiving the message on leadership and teamwork. These hostage negotiators receive quite a bit of training and yesterday I helped them understand the why behind some of the police training they receive. What I realized after working with this group, is that for the hostage team it isn’t always the hostage taker that creates all the stress and pressure, but it is working within the team and how they handle the pressure from outside sources like, administration, other teams and the media. To do their jobs well, they all have to stay calm under pressure and communicate consistently and effectively. They are a very effective and hard working group who don’t always get all the credit they deserve. I was honored to speak and work with them yesterday. They are a very valuable resource to our communities.